Saturday, October 11, 2008

Ex-Trooper Admits Using Police Computer For Galante Worker

(Connecticut) Hartford Courant

By EDMUND H. MAHONY
October 10, 2008


A state trooper who lost his job will be barred from working in law enforcement again after pleading guilty Thursday to illegally accessing a police computer to obtain information for an employee of convicted Danbury trash magnate James Galante.

Ex-trooper Paul Galietti, 41, of Southbury, also could be sentenced to as much as six months in jail and fined up to $5,000 under the terms of a plea bargain agreement with federal prosecutors. Senior U.S. District Judge Ellen B. Burns scheduled sentencing for Jan. 6.

Galietti became ensnared in a federal investigation of price fixing in the Connecticut and eastern New York trash markets by doing a favor for his cousin, Richard Galietti, who was a salesman for Automated Waste Disposal, one of Galante's companies.

In September 2004, investigators monitoring a wiretap listened in on a conversation between the cousins. Paul Galietti thanked his cousin for a free dumpster that had been delivered to his home by another of Galante's companies. Richard Galietti then asked the trooper to run a law enforcement computer check on a Connecticut license plate.

Paul Galietti reported during a second call three minutes later that the registration belonged to a small garbage company that had recently begun operations in Danbury. Paul Galietti then warned his cousin never to "tell anybody I did that for you because you'll get me fired. It's a serious thing now. OK?"

Later in the conversation, Paul Galietti said, "Yeah no, really, the federal government pinches you now. That's now a real ... serious thing."

Investigators determined after the call that Paul Galietti received free tickets to sporting events from his cousin, including tickets to New York Giants football games.

Paul Galietti on Wednesday became the last of the 33 people charged in the trash case to plead guilty.

Galante was sentenced last month to seven years and three months in prison for racketeering. Richard Galietti was sentenced to slightly less than four years in prison in July after pleading guilty to racketeering conspiracy.

* * * *
* * * *

How Much Cold Can Your Household Stand?

Jim Shea, The Hartford Courant
October 11, 2008

It's October.

It's New England.

It's the time of the year when everyone is wondering the same thing.

When do you turn on the heat?

There are the physical indicators to consider:

Can you see your breath?

Is there a layer of frost on the rugs in the morning?

Have the plants turned black?

Has there been a confirmed case of frostbite?

When you invite guests for dinner, do they come in snowmobile suits?

Are any family members beginning to grow fur?

Right now, we are in "John Adams" mode in my house. By that I mean we are walking around nights draped in blankets like they did back in the 1700s.

When I say blanket, I don't mean big fluffy quilt or anything. I'm talking about more of a shawl, except I don't want to use the word shawl because I'm pretty sure one of the Real Men's Club bylaws specifically states: Real men don't wear shawls.

Of course, there was a time when we didn't worry about turning on the heat, a time when we wore T-shirts around the house in the dead of winter. But that was back before it was cheaper to burn dollar bills than oil.

You try wearing a T-shirt around the average house now in the dead of winter and you will be dead in winter.

The good thing about October is that while it can get nippy, the temperature fluctuations are still such that if your house gets too cold you have other options:

You can go outside to warm up.

You can use the fireplace, although with the price of wood these days it might be less expensive to burn the furniture ... not that there aren't certain pieces of our furniture I wouldn't mind seeing going up in smoke.

You can go sit in the car and turn on the heated seats.

The bottom line is that deciding when to rouse the furnace is an individual decision based on personal circumstances:

How much cold can you stand?

What is your heating budget?

Is anyone in your house experiencing menopause? (Hot flashes can reduce a home's energy bills by as much as 75 percent.)

How comfortable are you wearing a shawl?



• Contact Jim Shea at shea@courant.com, and read his political humor column, Raucous, Sunday in CTWeek, and his new column on baby boomers, "Boom," in CTLiving on Wednesday.

Comments left in the Courant forum so far:

Steven_G_Erickso n
Ashburnham, MA

People should know how to keep warm even if they are living outside. Our present economy means that people with no experience of having to live on no money without heat are going to have to learn quick or freeze.

I was current on 3 Connecticut mortgages when I was jumped in my dark driveway one night. I pepper sprayed the mugger and ended up getting sentenced to a year in prison for pepper spraying the mugger. Self-defense I found out is not legal in Connecticut that is another story.

I had a worker's one piece snow suit sold at Home Depot and other places. By wearing that thermal worker's wear I was able to sleep outside in the Winter without heat. You just need wool socks, untie your boots and wear a ski mask.

I did that in Vermont. I would go into fast food restaurants to bath in bathroom stalls and would wash my cloths too. Do a word search on my name and you might find the youtube video of how I survived outside in the Winter in Vermont.

Some Connecticut residents that have lost their jobs and home might benefit from the information.

Ice Man
Meriden, CT


Steven_G_Erickson wrote:
People should know how to keep warm even if they are living outside. Our present economy means that people with no experience of having to live on no money without heat are going to have to learn quick or freeze.
I was current on 3 Connecticut mortgages when I was jumped in my dark driveway one night. I pepper sprayed the mugger and ended up getting sentenced to a year in prison for pepper spraying the mugger. Self-defense I found out is not legal in Connecticut that is another story.
I had a worker's one piece snow suit sold at Home Depot and other places. By wearing that thermal worker's wear I was able to sleep outside in the Winter without heat. You just need wool socks, untie your boots and wear a ski mask.
I did that in Vermont. I would go into fast food restaurants to bath in bathroom stalls and would wash my cloths too. Do a word search on my name and you might find the youtube video of how I survived outside in the Winter in Vermont.
Some Connecticut residents that have lost their jobs and home might benefit from the information.


And this tale is about cold how. Your record is a matter of public record, you are better off in VT and so is Connecticut.

Steven_G_Erickso n
Ashburnham, MA


Ice Man wrote:
And this tale is about cold how. Your record is a matter of public record, you are better off in VT and so is Connecticut.


It should be a matter of embarrassment officer "iceman". Shouldn't you be working on the police computer, not playing and commenting on the Courant forum?

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